Wednesday, April 26, 2017

How to Find Jobs Late in Life

Many people nearing retirement age will need to keep working until they are in their 60s or 70s in order to have enough money to support themselves and their families.  However, sometimes people lose their jobs in their 50s, or they work in physically demanding jobs and know their bodies will not be able to take the punishment much longer.  What can people do when they need to change jobs late in life?

The good news is that it is quite possible to find new careers or less physically demanding jobs as you age. My husband and I have known a number of people who have started new careers in their later years.  Most of them found the jobs through the normal application process.  However, for those who have trouble finding a new job on their own, there are special programs to help them.

How to Find an Job After 50

Whether you are looking for a new job because you are no longer physically able to handle your current one, or because you were fired or laid off, you may believe you are getting too old to find another career.  Some people talk themselves into the idea that no one will hire them after they have reached a certain age. However, you may be pleasantly surprised to know there are more opportunities than you realize, if you know where to find them.  Below is a list of organizations which could make your job search a little easier.

BankWork$ - This is a free training program which teaches people of all ages how to become bank tellers and customer-service reps.  They will also help you polish your resume and find a job.  You can get more information at bankworks.org.

Department of Labor Job Centers - The Department of Labor operates over 2,000 American Job Centers which are committed to helping workers of all ages who either want to be re-trained or find a new job.  These centers are also called CareerOneStop and you can find more information about them at https://www.careeronestop.org/

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) - Although the Department of Labor program mentioned above is for people of all ages, SCSEP is specifically for unemployed people ages 55 and older who have low household incomes.  The program participants are paid the minimum wage while they get experience working for nonprofits and public institutions.  SCSEP is affiliated with the National Council on Aging (NCOA).  You can get more information on the NCOA website at https://www.ncoa.org/economic-security/matureworkers/scsep/ 

AARP Back to Work 50+ - This AARP program works with community colleges, nonprofit partners and workforce boards to help people over the age of 55 who do not qualify for SCSEP because their household income is too high.  You can call (855) 850-2525 for more information about the program.

Where Else Can You Find Help Getting a New Job?

If you have explored the above organizations, but are interested in seeing what other options are available in your community, here are a few additional ideas to help you find a new career, even if you are 55 or older.

Attend job fairs in your community - They may lead you to jobs you never considered ... either full or part-time, permanent or temporary. A wide variety of jobs can often be found at these local events.

Apply to your local community college - Local colleges frequently offer training programs and job placement assistance with businesses in the community.  Many of them offer training which meets the specific needs of factories, industries and businesses in your town.

Contact local unions and trade associations about job opportunities - At the very least, these organizations can often put you in touch with job training and apprenticeship programs.

Visit your neighborhood senior center - Senior centers not only hire senior citizens themselves, but they often know of job opportunities for retirees in your area.

Most important, do not give up your job search.  There are opportunities available, even for people in their 60s and 70s. Go to local retail stores and other businesses and politely ask to fill out an application, just as you did when you were younger.  Look for help-wanted ads in the newspaper and online. You need to keep searching until you find the opportunity which is right for you.  Remember, you have a lifetime of skills and experience to offer a prospective employer.

If you would like an overview of retirement planning, watch for my book Retirement Awareness, which is being published by Griffin Publishing and Watering Seeds in the Fall of 2017.

If you are interested in learning more about financial planning for retirement, where to retire, common medial issues, changing family relationships after retirement and more, use the tabs or pull down menu at the top of the page to find links to hundreds of additional articles.

You are reading from the blog:  http://www.baby-boomer-retirement.com

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