Thursday, October 4, 2012

Where Obama and Romney Stand on Issues


Blue States are Leaning Obama
Red States are Leaning Romney
Other States are Undetermined
 No blog about retirement can simply ignore the upcoming presidential election.  Many people are still undecided and the recent debate did little to clear things up for a number of individuals.  With about a month left until the national election, the vote could still go either way. 

Consequently, it is important that we address some of the issues that may be important to our readers.  Often senior citizens are lumped into one "pot" and it is assumed that we all think alike.  Of course this is ridiculous.  Many of us are influenced by our religious beliefs, our personal financial situation, health issues that are a concern for ourselves and other family members, and various other issues.  Therefore, I am making an attempt to mention a few important issues, while trying to remain as impartial and factual as possible.  I have also avoided publishing all the accusations the candidates are making about each others' programs since most of those negative comments are unproductive.

I respect the right of citizens to make up their own minds about the presidential election, and I wish to inform rather than influence.  An issue that is extremely important to one person may not be important at all to someone else.  Only you know the best decision for you and your family.  Listed below are some of the facts that I have been able to gleen from various news sources.  Hopefully, this information will be helpful to you as you decide which candidate supports policies that will benefit you, your spouse, your adult children, grandchildren and your family in the future.

Obama vs Romney on the Issues

Medicare

Obama: Wants to keep the current Medicare system, but make it more efficient.  The Affordable Healthcare Act cut the payments made to doctors and insurance companies by $716 billion in order to reform the program and save money without reducing benefits to Medicare recipients.

Romney:  Wants to keep the current Medicare system for those 55 and above, but initiate a voucher program for our children and future generations.  He would reverse the $716 billion reform.  Instead, he believes that more competition will eventually reduce the amount of money that the government will spend in the future on healthcare for senior citizens.

Social Security

Obama:  Wants to strengthen the current system of Social Security, but not make major changes that would slash benefits for beneficiaries.

Romney:  Wants to raise the retirement age and initiate means testing so that higher-income retirees will see smaller growth in their benefits.

Health Care Reform

Obama:  Wants to fully implement the Affordable Healthcare Act.  So far, the Act had made it possible for children to stay on their parents' plans until age 26.  In addition, younger children can no longer be denied health insurance because of pre-existing conditions.  By January, 2014, everyone will be expected to have health insurance, even those adults with pre-existing conditions, and insurance pools will be open to the poor and those who cannot get a policy through their job.  This will save billions of dollars that are currently being spent  by the government, hospitals and insurance companies when they are forced to pick up the tab for those who have no insurance and cannot afford to pay for their medical bills.

Romney:  Wants to keep some parts of the Affordable Healthcare Act, but eliminate the remainder.  He believes that the marketplace and state governments will voluntarily continue to provide coverage for children up to age 26 and health care for those who are uninsured.  He wants individuals with pre-existing conditions to be covered, but only if they already have had continuous coverage.  He wants states to receive block grants to cover Medicaid for the poor in the way that they believe will work best in their states.

Obama vs Romney on Other Issues

There are, of course, other issues that are important to seniors, including caregiving, job training, tax programs and economic growth.  However, these issues are more difficult to compare because one side or the other has been vague about providing specific information about how they would address these problems.  I believe there is no point in publishing vague statements such as "I want to provide more economic growth," or "I want to lower taxes for the middle class" if there are few specifics about exactly how these programs will be paid for and implemented.  Instead I preferred to limit the scope of this post to the stands the candidates have taken on a few issues important to retirees and the specific information the candidates have provided.

You may also be interested in reading:

Your Retirement Money and the Fed Decision
Pros and Cons of Social Security Privatization
Important Medicare Tips for Boomers
How the Affordable Healthcare Act Affects You
How to Access Your Social Security Information Online

You are reading from the blog:  http://baby-boomer-retirement.blogspot.com

Electoral college map courtesy of www.en.wikipededia.com/commons

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for pulling out the issues that deal with seniors from the sludge of other topics we have to consider when voting. It's important to understand these views from both sides as they could alter the predicted future seniors had envisioned for themselves. Great job!

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